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The Florence section consists of 12 pages and five index pages housing
615 images, each thoroughly captioned as a result of considerable research.

There are separate sections for the Cathedral of Florence (Duomo), with pages on the
Architectural Details; Architectural Scenics and Sculptures; the Baptistry of St. John;
and Giotto’s Campanile (bell tower). A separate section contains three pages on
the Churches of Florence. One page is a detailed presentation of Santa Croce,
the Pantheon of Florence. Another page details the Basilica of San Lorenzo,
parish church of the Medici, and the third page shows exteriors and some
interiors of several of the other important churches in Florence. There is a
separate section on the Palazzo Vecchio (Old Palace), with two pages
 showing the Architecture and Art of the public spaces other than the
private residence, and a page on the Apartment of the Elements,
the residence of Cosimo I de’ Medici and Eleonora di Toledo.

Three separate pages give detailed presentations on the
Sculptures of Florence; Florentine Scenery; and the last
page is on the Palazzo Pitti’s Boboli Gardens and the
Grotta Grande (also called the Grotto of Buontalenti).

The Florence Select page is a Master Index to each of the other pages, hyperlinked to sections of the page.
 You can still visit each page as if it were a standard Gallery page... each page has its own hyperlinked Index.

Click a display composite below to select a page.

Welcome to Florence, Birthplace of the Renaissance.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Florence Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

There are a number of images in this section that are not yet on the Photoshelter site.
If an image you want is not yet uploaded, contact Ron Reznick (info at bottom of page).

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There are 11 Galleries in the Photoshelter Florence Collection

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Florence_Select


The Master Index page, with a hyperlinked index to each of the pages.

This page will allow you to see what is contained on each page.
You can go directly to a page that interests you by clicking on a
display composite below, or use the Master Index page to
select a page or a hyperlink to specific page content.

Duomo


Santa Maria del Fiore, the Campanile
and the Florence Baptistry of St. John

A detailed look at the Florence Cathedral architecture
including Giotto’s Campanile and Brunelleschi’s Dome,
major contributions to the revolution of the Renaissance.
Baptistry images include the Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise
and the exquisite 13th century mosaics covering the ceiling.

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Art and architecture of several of Florence’s
churches, including Santa Croce and San Lorenzo,
which contain some of the most beautiful Renaissance art.

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Frescoes, Sculpture, and Architecture of the Palazzo Vecchio (Old Palace),
the Apartment of the Elements (the private residence of Cosimo I de’ Medici)
and the Quartiere di Eleonora (the private apartments of Eleonora di Toledo).
Some of the finest Renaissance art was created for the Grand Duke’s rooms.

Sculpture_display


In Florence, sculptures are nearly everywhere you look. The place is literally infested with sculptures.
On this page I have assembled a selection of sculptures created by the finest artists of the Gothic period,
the Low- and High-Renaissance, the Mannerist and Baroque periods and the Neo-Classical period.

Scenery_display


Florence is a great place to walk. Around every corner is something interesting.
After the churches and all the art history of the other pages, this page displays
some of the scenery encountered during my excursions in this fascinating city.

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The Boboli Gardens are located behind the Palazzo Pitti, the Ducal palace of Cosimo I
de’ Medici, the first of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany. Palazzo Pitti was originally built by one
of the Medici family’s competitors to exceed in every way their Palazzo Medici, but it was later
bought by Eleonora di Toledo de’ Medici. The hill behind the Palazzo Pitti, excavated for stone to
expand the buildings, was then turned into the Boboli Gardens, a segmented strolling garden with
statues, fountains, grottoes, water tricks and other features which became the most often copied
of the Italian Formal Gardens. Boboli’s design influenced formal gardens in the rest of Europe.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Florence Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 11 Galleries in the Photoshelter Florence Collection

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