SequoiaNP

Sequoia National Park and King’s Canyon National Park are adjacent and contiguous parks
which were formed to protect the Giant Forest and General Grant Grove of Giant Sequoias in
the western Sierra Nevada mountains about three hours to the south of Yosemite National Park.
The General Sherman and General Grant Sequoias are two of the world’s largest trees by volume.

Click an image to open a larger version.
Use your back button to return to this page.

Yosemite Section Index
 

Yosemite Select

Yosemite Valley
Valley Views
Yosemite Assorted
Mirror Lake
Rivers and Creeks

Waterfalls
Yosemite Falls

Yosemite Rim
Glacier Point and Washburn Point
Taft Point

Yosemite Wildlife
Deer and Birds
Squirrel and Marmot

Yosemite Plant Life
Mariposa Grove
Sequoia National Park
Assorted Plant Life

Bodie Ghost Town
Mono Lake
Mariposa

A 75 image Overview of the Yosemite Portfolio

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Discovery View (Wawona Tunnel View) and Valley View
El Capitan, Half Dome, Cathedral Rocks, and other Scenery
The exquisitely beautiful Mirror Lake in Tenaya Canyon
The Merced River, Tenaya Creek, Yosemite Creek and more

Bridalveil, Vernal and Nevada Falls, and selected images of Yosemite Falls
Detail shots, vignettes and scenic images of Yosemite’s signature waterfall

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Yosemite National Park’s two most famous rim views
Taft Point Fissures and spectacular views from 3000’ over Yosemite Valley

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Mule Deer in the Valley meadows, Hummingbirds, Steller’s Jays, etc.
Golden-Mantled Squirrels, Ground Squirrels and a Tioga Pass Marmot

An Overview page with sample images from the following pages:
Images from the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias
Images from nearby Sequoia and King’s Canyon National Parks
Lupines, Dogwood, Snow Plants, Thistle, Forest Moss and Lichen

50 images of the gold mining boom town north of Mono Lake
A highly saline lake in the Eastern Sierras with otherworldly scenery
A Cigar Store Indian, a Thunderbird Totem, and antique Farm Machinery

Sunburst3

Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

Sunburst3
Paul_Bunyan_Three_Rivers_X0196


Paul Bunyan Three Rivers X0196
(536 KB)

Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox, taken in the early morning in spring.

Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox were carved from a single Giant Sequoia
log by Carroll Barnes in 18 months between 1940-41. It stands in front of the
Three Rivers Historical Museum, at the base of Ash Mountain in the town
of Three Rivers, below the southern entrance to Sequoia National Park.

Paul_Bunyan_Three_Rivers_X6958


Paul Bunyan Three Rivers X6958
(653 KB)

Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox, taken in mid-afternoon in October on the way out of Sequoia National Park. Weighing in at about 13 tons, the statue was carved from a a 40 ton fallen Sequoia using only a hammer and chisel.

Paul_Bunyan_Three_Rivers_X6965


Paul Bunyan Three Rivers X6965
(788 KB)

The statue stands over 20 feet tall on its Sequoia pedestal and is the largest sculpture ever made from a single Sequoia log. Carroll Barnes later made many other sculptures including another Paul Bunyan at Visalia’s College of the Sequoias.

Paul_Bunyan_Three_Rivers_X6956


Paul Bunyan Three Rivers X6956
(786 KB)

Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox in front of the Three Rivers Historical Museum,
a 13 ton single-log Sequoia sculpture hand-carved by Carroll Barnes in 1940-1941.

Ash_Mountain_Sign_Sequoia_X6949


Ash Mountain Sign Sequoia X6949
(851 KB)

The Ash Mountain Entrance Sign for Sequoia National Park was carved in 1935 from Sequoia wood by George W. Munro, a CCC worker who had displayed a talent for wood carving. It was designed by the local architect Harold G. Fowler, who along with Munro selected a fallen Sequoia log from the Giant Forest. The design is based upon James Earl Fraser’s profile of an American Indian on the 1913-38 Buffalo Nickel.

The sign took several months to carve, and was erected during the winter of 1935-36, mounted on a four foot diameter Sequoia log with wrought iron brackets. The sign is ten feet wide, four feet high, and one foot thick. It stands on a two-tier masonry platform, and was originally unpainted. The sign is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Ash_Mountain_Sign_Sequoia_X6952


Ash Mountain Sign Sequoia X6952
(566 KB)

Ash_Mountain_Sign_Sequoia_X6954


Ash Mountain Sign Sequoia X6954
(635 KB)

Detail of the Ash Mountain Entrance Sign to Sequoia National Park,
carved from a single fallen Sequoia log by George W. Munro in 1935.

This group was taken at mid-afternoon in October. I took a wide landscape,
a portrait, and this detail shot, all three of which are displayed and available.

Tunnel_Rock_Old_Sequoia_Road_Autumn_X6943


Tunnel Rock Old Sequoia Road Autumn X6943
(809 KB)

Tunnel Rock is a granite boulder over the Old Sequoia Road. The boulder originally blocked the old road, which bypassed the rock. The CCC carved the lower side of the boulder to open enough space for a road, created the road itself, and the rock facing on the dirt wall. The work was completed in 1938.

The current road once again bypasses the boulder and Tunnel Rock is no longer a part of the road to Sequoia National Park, as the height of some vehicles is too great to allow passage.

It is, however, still an interesting sight to be seen on the road above the Ash Mountain Entrance when you are coming into Sequoia National Park from the southern side. These two images were taken at mid-afternoon in October.

Tunnel_Rock_Old_Sequoia_Road_Autumn_X6945


Tunnel Rock Old Sequoia Road Autumn X6945
(575 KB)

Tunnel_Rock_Old_Sequoia_Road_Spring_X0198


Tunnel Rock Old Sequoia Road Spring X0198
(675 KB)

Tunnel Rock and the Old Sequoia Road, above the Ash Mountain Entrance to
Sequoia National Park. This shot was taken on an early spring morning in May.

Sunburst3

Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

Sunburst3
Ash_Mountain_Sign_Sequoia_X0197


Ash Mountain Sign Sequoia X0197
(1014 KB)

Detail of the Ash Mountain Entrance Sign to Sequoia National Park,
carved from a single fallen Sequoia log by George W. Munro in 1935.

This shaded detail shot was taken on an early spring morning in May.

General_Sherman_Tree_Sequoia_X0201


General Sherman Tree Sequoia X0201
(680 KB)

The General Sherman Tree in the Giant Forest of Sequoia NP is the largest single-stem tree in the world by volume. It was named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman.

General_Sherman_Tree_Sequoia_X0203


General Sherman Tree Sequoia X0203
(552 KB)

When it was compared in 1931 with the General Grant Tree in the Grant Grove of nearby King’s Canyon NP, the standard of measuring trees by wood volume was established.

The General Sherman Tree is 275 feet tall, 102.6 feet in circumference at the base, and has a volume of 52,500 cubic feet.

General_Sherman_Tree_Sequoia_X0205


General Sherman Tree Sequoia X0205
(630 KB)

General Sherman is among the tallest, widest, and oldest trees on the planet, but it does not top any of those lists. General Grant is larger in circumference and diameter, but based upon trunk volume, General Sherman is champion.

General_Sherman_Tree_Sequoia_X0206


General Sherman Tree Sequoia X0206
(678 KB)

In 2006, the largest branch on the tree fell off, cratering the walkway pavement and smashing the fence. The branch was over 7 feet in diameter and about 100 feet long, but there were no injuries (and no witnesses to the spectacular fall).

General_Grant_Tree_Kings_Canyon_X0210


General Grant Tree King’s Canyon X0210
(657 KB)

The General Grant Tree in the Grant Grove of the adjacent King’s Canyon National Park, on a spring morning in May.

General_Grant_Tree_Kings_Canyon_X6840


General Grant Tree King’s Canyon X6840
(545 KB)

The General Grant Tree in  King’s Canyon NP, shot about an hour earlier, on an autumn morning in October.

The General Grant Tree was named for Ulysses S. Grant, the Union Army
Civil War General and the President of the United States from 1869-1877.

The General Grant Tree is 267.4 feet tall, 107.6 feet in circumference at the base, and has a volume of 46,608 cubic feet.

General_Grant_Tree_Kings_Canyon_X0211


General Grant Tree King’s Canyon X0211
(736 KB)

The General Grant Tree is the largest tree in the Grant Grove of Giant Sequoias
in King’s Canyon National Park, connected by the General’s Highway to Sequoia NP.
It is the third largest tree in the world by volume (*). In 1926, President Calvin Coolidge
proclaimed the Grant Tree to be the “Nation’s Christmas Tree”, after he was petitioned
by Charles E. Lee, who had organized the first Christmas program at the Grant Tree in
1925. Prior to 1931, the General Grant Tree was considered to be the largest tree in
the world due to its enormous base, but when it was measured and compared to the
General Sherman Tree in 1931, General Sherman turned out to be larger by volume.

Giant Sequoias are a species of Redwood which occur naturally only in groves of the
Western Sierra Nevada. The world’s most massive trees by volume, the largest grow
to more than 250 feet tall and 30 feet in diameter at the base. The oldest trees (which
are not necessarily the largest) can reach an age of 3500 years. Giant Sequoias are
protected from rot by the tannic acid in the bark and heartwood, and the thick bark is
 fire resistant. The trees have very shallow roots (3 to 6 feet) that can extend 100 to
150 feet (or more) from the tree, providing a stable base and gathering as much
as several thousand gallons of water per day. Mature trees produce thousands
of egg-shaped seed cones which are opened by fire or Douglas Squirrels.

* In the spring of 2011, a detailed measurement of the President Tree in the Giant Forest
of Sequoia National Park by Steve Sillett of Humboldt State University was performed by
rigging ropes and climbing the tree, taking detailed measurements to determine that the
3200 year old President Tree has a wood volume second only to the General Sherman.

General_Grant_Fire_Scar_Kings_Canyon_X0218


General Grant Fire Scar King’s Canyon X0218
(651 KB)

The basal fire scar on the General Grant Tree. Older Giant Sequoias all have fire scars like this. Sequoia bark is highly resistant to fire, and their chemical makeup resists rot, pests and disease. Sequoias require fire to open their seed cones and clear competing plant life, allowing seedlings to grow.

General_Grant_Tree_Crown_Detail_X0220


General Grant Tree Crown Detail X0220
(563 KB)

The General Grant Tree from a few feet above the base to the crown, shot from the side opposite the basal fire scar. The  Grant Grove was originally part of the General Grant National Park, created in 1890 along with Yosemite NP, about a week after Sequoia NP. In 1940, King’s Canyon NP was formed.

General_Grant_Tree_FE_Kings_Canyon_X6897


General Grant Tree FE King’s Canyon X6897
(587 KB)

General_Grant_Tree_FE_Kings_Canyon_X6899


General Grant Tree FE King’s Canyon X6899
(574 KB)

The General Grant Tree and the surrounding forest shot with a fisheye lens, an extreme wide angle lens
whose distortion at the edges bends subjects placed at the edge of the frame towards the center. The
lens shows a 180 degree angle of view (you have to be careful to keep your feet out of the frame) and
offers an exceptional perspective in the forest or for images taken from a high vantage point . To see
several images like these, visit the Taft Point and Glacier Point pages for some spectacular views.

Sunburst3

Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

Sunburst3
Giant_Sequoia_Kings_Canyon_X6870


Giant Sequoia King’s Canyon X6870
(584 KB)

Giant_Sequoia_Kings_Canyon_X6882


Giant Sequoia King’s Canyon X6882
(574 KB)

A Giant Sequoia and surrounding forest in the Grant Grove. The image at left was taken from
about 30 feet in front of the Sequoia, and tilting the camera back to place the entire tree in the
frame causes some keystone distortion (the Sequoia appears to be leaning away from the
viewer, and surrounding trees lean in towards the center). The image at right was taken
from about 100 feet away (26mm vs. 19mm), allowing the camera back to be closer
to parallel with the subject Sequoia, reducing the keystone distortion considerably.

Sequoia_Forest_FE_Kings_Canyon_X6885


Sequoia Forest FE King’s Canyon X6885
(756 KB)

An extreme wide angle shot of the scene, taken with a fisheye lens (180 degree field of view).
The fisheye lens offers a spectacular perspective in the forest. This was taken with the camera
back tilted up at a 45 degree angle (note how the trees at the edges bend towards the center).

Sequoia_Forest_FE_Kings_Canyon_X6888


Sequoia Forest FE King’s Canyon X6888
(793 KB)

Another extreme wide angle view of the Grant Grove taken with a fisheye lens. For this image,
the camera back was tilted up at about a 60 degree angle creating a more dramatic perspective.

Giant_Sequoia_Crown_Detail_X6893


Giant Sequoia Crown Detail X6893
(626 KB)

Crown detail of a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.

Most of the branches of Giant Sequoias are in the crown and the upper third of the tree.
The upper part of the crown is the most active part of the tree, producing far more cones.
A large Giant Sequoia can produce 10,000 to 30,000 cones, with over 300,000 seeds.

Giant_Sequoia_Bark_Detail_X6895


Giant Sequoia Bark Detail X6895
(643 KB)

Giant Sequoias in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon NP. The bark of the Giant Sequoia is quite thick and smoother than its close cousin, the California Redwood or Coast Redwood, the tallest trees on Earth (Sequoia sempervirens).

Giant_Sequoia_Bark_Detail_HS4326c


Giant Sequoia Bark Detail HS4326c
(541 KB)

Bark detail of a Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in the Grant Grove, showing fire scars. Sequoias can only grow in full sun and in mineral-rich soil, and only germinate when there is little competing vegetation or forest litter. They require fire to dry and open their seed cones and to clear away the competing vegetation and needle humus.

Giant_Sequoia_Bark_Detail_X6926


Giant Sequoia Bark Detail X6926
(798 KB)

The base of a Giant Sequoia and surrounding conifers in the Grant Grove.

Detail shots of the base, fire scars and bark of Giant Sequoia trees are below.

Sunburst3

Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

Sunburst3
Giant_Sequoia_Base_Detail_X6831


Giant Sequoia Base Detail X6831
(633 KB)

A large gnarled indentation in the base of a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove. This is a commonly seen characteristic of the base of mature Giant Sequoias.

Giant_Sequoia_Base_Detail_X6833


Giant Sequoia Base Detail X6833
(602 KB)

Sometimes these indentations can be hollowed out by fire, such as the one pictured above. These are sometimes used as dens by small forest mammals.

Giant_Sequoia_Fire_Scar_X6913


Giant Sequoia Fire Scar X6913
(624 KB)

A large vertical fire scar in a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.

Giant_Sequoia_Fire_Scars_X6923


Giant Sequoia Fire Scars X6923
(488 KB)

Fire scars on the base of a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.

Giant Sequoia bark is thick and non-resinous, and mature trees are more resistant to fire
than young Sequoias and other trees which populate the forests in which they live, however,
repeated exposure to fire over many centuries can sear through the bark of a tree at the base,
kill part of the vascular cambium which transports water, and produces an large vertical scar
which weakens the tree. Almost all large Sequoias have a vertical fire scar over a large
percentage of the basal circumference, although few are killed by fire scars like this.
They do provide an entry point for fungi which cause disease and weaken the tree.

Giant_Sequoia_Bark_Detail_HS4330


Giant Sequoia Bark Detail HS4330
(665 KB)

Fire scars in the base of a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.
This is a detail shot of the base of the tree shown in the vertical image displayed above right.

Wolf_Lichen_on_Stump_Sequoia_X0214


Wolf Lichen on Stump Sequoia X0214
(625 KB)

Wolf Lichen on a stump in the Giant Forest of Sequoia NP.

Wolf_Lichen_Sequoia_Kings_Canyon_X6940


Wolf Lichen Sequoia King’s Canyon X6940
(796 KB)

Wolf Lichen on a Giant Sequoia in the Grant Grove.

Wolf_Lichen_Red_Fir_Kings_Canyon_HS4355


Wolf Lichen Red Fir King’s Canyon HS4355
(617 KB)

Wolf Lichen on Red Fir trees in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.

Wolf Lichen (Letharia vulpina) is a yellow-green branching fungus that grows on
the bark of conifers (living and dead), and is toxic to mammals. It was historically
used as a poison for wolves and foxes (thus the name), and was used to make a
pigment for dyes and paints by the Native Americans in areas in which it grows.
It was also used in a healing poultice, and boiled for a drink to stop bleeding.

Wolf_Lichen_Red_Fir_Kings_Canyon_HS4321


Wolf Lichen Red Fir King’s Canyon HS4321
(805 KB)

Wolf_Lichen_Red_Fir_Kings_Canyon_X6912c1


Wolf Lichen Red Fir King’s Canyon X6912 c1
(769 KB)

A detail shot and detail crop of Wolf Lichen on Red Fir trees in the Grant Grove.

Wolf Lichen is highly resistant to freezing and low temperatures, and remains active in
winter. It resumes photosynthesis just a few minutes after it thaws, and it generally grows
at heights on a tree above the maximum snow line, so you can easily judge how deep the
snow can get in an area by the lowest height at which Wolf Lichen grows on the trees.

Wolf_Lichen_Red_Fir_Kings_Canyon_X6912c2


Wolf Lichen Red Fir King’s Canyon X6912 c2
(1087 KB)

A detail crop of Wolf Lichen on a Red Fir tree in the Grant Grove of King’s Canyon National Park.

More images of Wolf Lichen can be seen in the Forest Scenes section of the Taft Point page.

Sunburst3

Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Yosemite Collection page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 15 Galleries in the Photoshelter Yosemite Collection

For convenience, Galleries containing the images of Wildlife, Plants,
Sequoia National Park, Bodie Ghost Town, Mono Lake and Mariposa
have been copied to the Yosemite Collection from their normal locations.

Sunburst3
Mariposa_Grove


Click the Display Composite above to visit the Mariposa Grove page

Yosemite_Plant_Life


Click the Display Composite above to visit the Yosemite Plant Life page

Yosemite_Select


Click the Display Composite above to visit the Yosemite Select page

Content_
Contact_RR