Duomo_Architecture

Santa Maria del Fiore (Duomo)
The Cathedral of Florence

Architectural Details

This page details the 14th and 19th Century facades of the Cathedral (Duomo) of Florence,
The Basilica of Santa Maria del Fiore (Saint Mary of the Flower), built between 1296 and 1436.
The 14th century facades on the sides of the Duomo and on Giotto’s Campanile date from the 1340s.
The 19th c. facade on the front of the cathedral was created to cover the bare upper section of the Duomo,
which was never completed, and to replace the facade on the lower section which was removed in the
late 1580s by Grand Duke Francesco de’ Medici when Taddeo Gaddi’s facade was considered
too outdated for the Renaissance. The competition for its replacement was tainted by major
corruption scandals, and the Duomo was left bare until the 19th c. facade was completed.

GoldLine

During my research into the facade of the Duomo, I discovered that there is almost no information
available other than a basic overview of the elements... just a few bits and pieces here and there. It took
many, many hours to assemble information. I therefore decided that rather than provide yet another set of
images with threadbare support information, that I would err on the side of completeness. The group of pages
detailing the Duomo will therefore have a lot of information on the sculptures and other details of the Cathedral.
If you would prefer just looking at the images, of course that is one reason they are here. If on the other hand
you would like to find out something about one or more details on the facade, I am providing what I could
find after an extensive search, including reading several books written in the late 19th century, when the
new facade on the front of the Cathedral was just being constructed. My hope is that these pages will
provide a source of information for those looking for it, as well as a display venue for my images.

There will very likely be way too much information here for anyone but a student or someone
who wants to know something specific about part of the facade, but as I said, I wanted to err
on the side of completeness, primarily to save others from the frustration of the research.

Click an image to open a larger version
Use your back button to return to this page


14th century facade
 

19th century facade

The Portals

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Florence Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

Direct Link to the Gallery with images of Santa Maria del Fiore

Florentine Churches: The Duomo

There are a number of images in this section that are not yet on the Photoshelter site.
If an image you want is not yet uploaded, contact Ron Reznick (info at bottom of page).

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 11 Galleries in the Photoshelter Florence Collection

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DuomoFlorence_5930


Duomo Florence 5930

The 19th century Facade, just before sunrise on the only clear morning when I was in Florence.
The facade is highly detailed, as you can see, and the linked versions of these images are fairly
large files as a result. The typical image linked from this page ranges from 400 KB to 700 KB.
Below the titles of some of the larger images, I will list the pixel dimensions and file sizes.
 

Designed by Arnolfo di Cambio (1294) to be the largest Catholic church in the world at the time,
Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore (Saint Mary of the Flower) is the Cathedral Church (Duomo) of
Florence. The “Flower” is the Fleur-de-Lis, symbol of Florence. The church is known for its Dome,
designed and built by Filippo Brunelleschi, the largest dome ever built at the time (it is even now the
largest masonry dome in the world) and the largest dome ever built without scaffolding or buttresses.
Brunelleschi designed and built innovative hoists and cranes to move 37,000 tons of stone and brick
over 200 feet in the air and place it with extreme precision. The masonry double dome used some of
the first iron reinforcements, predating iron and steel structural reinforcements by hundreds of years.

These innovations, along with his brilliant masonry techniques, are part of the reason why
Filippo Brunelleschi is considered to be one of the fathers of Renaissance architecture.
The Brunelleschi Dome is on the Architectural Scenics, Sculptures and Interiors page.
I did put one large image of the dome at the bottom of this page, as a bit of a teaser.

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4177


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4177
1406 x 1000 (611 KB)

Porta dei Canonici and right transept.

The church is the site of Giotto’s 14th century Campanile (Bell Tower), a free-standing
Florentine Gothic masterpiece with a polychrome facade of pink, green and white marble.
The Duomo’s facade is also polychrome marble. The facade is adorned with lunettes, rosettes,
numerous statues in niches, bas-reliefs and a plethora of other details. It is truly awesome to behold.

Erected on the site of the earlier Cathedral of Florence (Santa Reparata, which was built before 430 AD), the Duomo was designed in 1294 by Arnolfo di Cambio (who also designed Santa Croce and the Palazzo Vecchio). After Arnolfo di Cambio died in 1302, work stalled for 28 years (except for a short period between 1318 and 1319, until lethal political problems between Guelphs and Ghibellines stopped everything else) until 1330, when  the relics of St. Zenobius were found in Santa Reparata (which was crumbling, but was still being used). The Wool Merchants Guild took over patronage of the construction and assigned Giotto di Bondone as Chief Architect. Giotto, the first of the great Renaissance artists, continued work following di Cambio’s plans, and is most recognized for the work he did on the Campanile (Bell Tower), besides his numerous frescoes and other artworks in the churches and other locations around Italy. The Black Plague halted work in 1348, but it was resumed in 1349 and by 1375, Santa Reparata was demolished. The nave was completed in 1380, leaving only the dome to be built.

In the first set of images below are some details of the 14th c. facade by Andrea Orcagna and Taddeo Gaddi.

14th century facade

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4174


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4174
800 x 1200 (529 KB)

The lunette (arched niche over the lintel), pediment
(triangular gable above the lunette) and tondo (round
sculptured image in the center of the pediment) over
the Porta dei Canonici (shown previously). To the left
is a mullioned window (one or two structural pillars in
windows, often seen in decorative Gothic designs).

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4299


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4299
724 x 1213 (470 KB)

Detail of the lunette and pediment. These images were
taken on several days at different angles (and times of
the day), so the color will change from image to image.

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4301


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4301
857 x 1290 (560 KB)

Closer detail. I am sneaking in bit by bit to give you the most detail balanced by a complete set of views
in the 1200 pixel portrait images I use on the web. There are a few larger (M-sized) portrait images also.

In architecture, the triangular space in a pediment over a door or window is called a tympanum.
Below is a detailed view of the lunette and tympanum with its sculptured tondo and supporting angels.

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4301c


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4301c
1144 x 1325 pixel (700 KB)

A detail crop of the lunette, pediment and tondo and the 14th c. sculptures. Note the file size.
The lunette sculpture set is a “Virgin and Child with Two Angels” by Lorenzo di Giovanni d’Ambroglio.
In the tondo are two figures wrapping Christ in his shroud, supported by two angels in the lower spaces.

Designed by a number of distinguished early-Renaissance artists (most notably Andrea Orcagna, one of
 Leonardo da Vinci’s teachers, and Taddeo Gaddi, who was Giotto’s primary pupil), the 14th c. facade contains
a plethora of fine Gothic detail and some superb early-Renaissance sculptures. Many of the sculptures which are
 free-standing on the facade are copies of the original sculptures (originals are in the Opera del Duomo Museum).

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4276


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4276
1403 x 930 (531 KB)

Second story transept detail including decorative mullioned windows in the area above and to the
right of Porta dei Canonici whose lunette and pediment were detailed in the previous set of images.
Part of the detail shown in this image can be seen at the top right of the first image in this series.

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4179


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4179
750 x 1200 (455 KB)

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4180c


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4180c
960 x 1290 (589 KB)

Detail of the lunette, pediment and mullioned window
over Porta del Campanile (closest to Giotto’s Campanile).
There are empty sculptural niches above and beside the
pediments (beside the window are empty support pillars).

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4275


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4275
800 x 1225 (528 KB)

Detail of the lunette, tympanum and tondo of this
unique section of the facade. Note the empty niches
beside the pediment. This section of the facade uses
some beautiful pink Rosa Perlino marble accents.

14thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4275c


14th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4275c
792 x 1290 (460 KB)

“Christ Giving a Blessing” is the tondo relief.
This image is in the style of Andrea Pisano.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Florence Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

Direct Link to the Gallery with images of Santa Maria del Fiore

Florentine Churches: The Duomo

There are a number of images in this section that are not yet on the Photoshelter site.
If an image you want is not yet uploaded, contact Ron Reznick (info at bottom of page).

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 11 Galleries in the Photoshelter Florence Collection

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19th century facade

DuomoFlorence_4026M


Duomo Florence 4026M
1500 x 1600 (872 KB)

Shot on a rather dark and heavily overcast late afternoon, I used my high-speed wide angle
(28mm f/1.4, generally used for low-light indoor shots rather than exteriors) and underexposed
a stop plus used a fairly wide aperture of f/5.6 to achieve a reasonable shutter speed for this
image. Most folks will not be interested in that sort of thing, but the photographers will be.
Under conditions like this, with reflective marble and low light, color changes radically
with different angles. Note the difference in character between this image and the
next one, taken at a distance with the 85mm f/1.4 at f/4 without underexposure.

OK... enough photographic discussion... On to the architectural details.

The image above shows the upper central and right sections of the 19th c.
facade., including the Rose Window and the right Rosette Window. Below the
Rose Window in the largest tabernacle is a statue of Mary with the infant Jesus,
surrounded by the Apostles (nine of which are shown here). More detail is below.

Duomo_RoseWindow_Apostles_4014


Duomo Rose Window Apostles 4014
1500 x 1065 (650 KB)

Detail of the central upper section of the 19th c. facade, showing the Rose Window, the central
statue of Mary, and eight of the 12 statues of Apostles. Note the difference between the Rose Window
and the smaller Rosette Windows above the portals, detailed in several of the images above and below.
The previous shot and the one below right show both the Rose Window and the Rosette above the right portal.
These three images have been brought over from the Architectural Scenics, Sculptures and Interiors page.

19thC_FacadeDetail_DuomoFlorence_4030


19th c. Facade Detail Duomo Florence 4030
1400 x 1018 (667 KB)

Detail of the central and right portals, showing the
lunette mosaics, pediments, the rosette above the
right portal, and the numerous sculptures of the
19th c. Neo-Gothic design by Emilio de Fabris.

The 14th century facade for the front of the
Duomo was removed at the end of the 16th C.
by order of Grand Duke Francesco I de Medici.
A competition was to be held to replace it with a
more up-to-date facade, but the competition was
a huge corrupted scandal and the facade was left
blank until the late 19th C., when this was created.

There is not much space in the piazza between
The Baptistry of San Giovanni (St. John) and the
Duomo to shoot upper sections of the facade (see
the image to the right), so there are a few perspective
issues in this image. The light was a little low too, forcing
me to shoot at f/4, so the statues at the top are defocused.

Duomo_Florence_4007


Duomo Florence 4007
800 x 1290 (495 KB)

This image shows the spatial relationships between
the Baptistry (at left), the Duomo, and the Dome.

The Portals

In my descriptions of the Portals, I am defining the Right Portal as the one on the right as you
face the church from the piazza. I have seen it described both ways (with right being the right Portal
from both inside and outside of the church), and since we are discussing the exterior facade it
seemed sensible to me to call the portal on the right from outside the church the Right Portal.

19thC_LeftPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_5086


19th c. Left Portal Detail Duomo Florence 5086
787 x 1290 (444 KB)

Detail of the left Portal including niche sculptures of
Cardinal Pietro Valeriani (Valerianus Legatus, at left),
who blessed the Duomo’s foundations in 1296. and of
Bishop Agostino Tinacci (Tinaccius Episc., right), who
blessed the first pilaster in 1357. Both by Salvino Salvini.

Detailed images of the tympanum and lunette follow.

19thC_LeftPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4056


19th c. Left Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4056
791 x 1290 (537 KB)

Detail of the lunette (more below), pediment and tondo.
Note the small sculptures beside the base of the lunette.
On the left and right are depictions of Adam and Eve as a
caveman and a bare-breasted cavewoman wearing furs.
Adam and Eve were created by Torelli. Notice the long-
necked Angels in the tympanum triangles supporting the
tondo with a sculpture of Christ Bound by Passaglia.

19thC_LeftPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4056c


19th c. Left Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4056c
1404 x 1175 (683 KB)

The left Portal Lunette mosaic: “Charity among the Founders of Florentine Philanthropic Foundations”
(some of these titles can get a little flowery). Cartoons for the mosaic were created by Niccolo Barabino.
It shows Charity seated on a throne at the base of which are coats of arms of various charitable institutions.
The people approaching Charity are the Founders of the principal hospitals and the Misericordia at the time.

In the architrave (moulding around the lunette) are finely detailed sculptures of Saint Joseph (husband of Mary)
and Angels, plus small bas-reliefs of angels and various animals entwined within elaborate climbing vines.

19thC_MainPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4040


19th c. Main Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4040
750 x 1290 (623 KB)

Detail of the Porta Maggiore, a much more ostentatious use of Neo-Gothic elements. Atop the pediment are statues of the Madonna flanked by the Apostles in tabernacle niches (the sculpture of Madonna holding the baby Jesus was created by Tito Sarocchi). In the spaces between the top of the pilasters and the pediment are the five priests blowing their trumpets before the walls of Jericho. The door frame, pilasters and pediment exhibit an elaborately ornate decorative style that has provided material for 150 years of critical discussion (many critics consider the entire facade to be overdecorated).

19thC_MainPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_5081


19th c. Main Portal Detail Duomo Florence 5081
745 x 1290 (473 KB)

The tympanum contains a  bas-relief of the Madonna, seated and surrounded by seraphims and the Gonfaloniere and Priors (Magistrates) of the Florentine Republic who ordered the building of the Cathedral, along with Pope Callixtus III, St. Catherine of Siena, and others. On top of the pilasters are Pope Leo the Great (Leo I, d. 461) and Pope Gregory VII (d. 1085), two very powerful Popes. Pope Callixtus I (d. 222), and Pope Celestine I (d. 432) are under baldachins in the middle of the left pilaster, and in the middle of the right pilaster are St. Jerome (d. 420) and St. Bonaventure, also under baldachins.

Leo the Great was the Pope who talked Attila the Hun out of attacking Rome, right in front of the city walls. His statue was executed by R. Romanelli. Pope Gregory VII was one of the great reforming popes, who condemned the corruption of simony (paying for church sacraments) and instituted many other reforms, as well as many international  political maneuvers. He ended his papacy in exile in Salerno, the victim of bishops who wanted to continue being paid for providing sacraments (simony) and who refused his call for celibacy. His statue was created by Fumagalli.

The statues of Callixtus I, Celestine I, St. Jerome and St. Bonaventure were all created by Dante Soldini. Callixtus I was an early Pope (217 to 222) who was martyred (possibly by being thrown down a well). Celestine I was also an early Pope (422-432) and  was involved with the Council of Epheseus. St. Jerome (347-420) translated the Greek and Hebrew Bible into Latin (and numerous other texts). St. Bonaventure (1221-1274) was a Franciscan scholar, a philosopher, and Cardinal Bishop of Albano.

Upper_MainPortal_4020c


Upper Main Portal 4020c
1380 x 1200 (722 KB)

Above and below are two highly detailed images showing the area above the Porta Maggiore
(the Main Portal). I have split this into two images to allow examination of the fine detail of the
tympanum and surrounding sculptures and reliefs, and of the sculptures in tabernacles beside
the Lunette. The image that these two detail crops came from was taken with the 85mm f/1.4,
a lens that renders extremely fine detail, greater than that of any wide angle, so the statues in
the tabernacles are rendered with more detail in this pair of images than in any of the others.

The image above shows, left to right, Pope Leo the Great in a tabernacle atop the pilaster;
three of the priests blowing trumpets before Jericho in the truncated triangular space; the
highly elaborate tympanum bas-relief depicting an older Virgin Mary seated, surrounded by
eleven Seraphim beside and above her, and a bronze Dove in the apex of the tympanum. At
her feet is an altar with the Lamb. In front of Mary are Gonfaloniere and Priori of the Florentine
Republic who ordered the building of the Cathedral, plus Pope Callisto III, Christopher Columbus,
the Franciscan monk Giovanni Perez of Marchena, St. Catherine of Siena and St. Pius V. This relief
is the largest and most conspicuous on the facade (in the most important position above the Main Portal).
To the right of the tympanum, in the truncated triangular space, are two priests trumpeting at Jericho, and in
the tabernacle atop the right pilaster is Pope Gregory VII (by Galli). Pope Leo was created by Romanelli.

Central_MainPortal_4020c


Central Main Portal 4020c
1380 x 1200 (784 KB)

Given that this part of the facade is shown in other images below, I normally would have only
shown the upper section you have just seen, but the combination of the flat light, the angle, and
the superb detail-rendering ability of the 85mm f/1.4 lens mean that this image shows things that
can not be seen in the other images, making it worth your while to see this image. You will note
an extreme difference in color between these two images and the ones below. Image 4020
was one of the images taken on that dark and dreary, heavily overcast first afternoon.

At the bottom of the image are the medallions containing the coats of arms of families
that donated more than 5000 francs to the fund for the facade. Above is the extremely
ornate arch housing the lunette with its depictions of Florentine Saints and the mosaic
 “Christ Enthroned with Mary and St. John the Baptist”, (detailed in the images below).
On the left pilaster under baldachin (canopies) are Popes Callixtus I and Celestine I,
and on the right pilaster are St. Jerome and St. Bonaventure, also under baldachin.

Nun_DuomoDoor_4243


Nun Duomo Door 4243
795 x 1200 (503 KB)

While I was taking detail shots of the Porta Maggiore, an
accommodating nun walked by to add a bit of sparkle to
the shot. Here, and in the next image (sans nun) can
be seen detail of the spiral decorative columns, the
 statues of St. Reparata (left) and St. Zenobius (right)
beside the bronze doors, and a variety of other
sculptures, bas-reliefs and decorative items.

19thC_MainPortalLunette_DuomoFlorence_4246


19th c. Main Portal Lunette Duomo Florence 4246
800 x 1380 (493 KB)

On the front of the pilasters are bas-reliefs of Moses,
David, Solomon and Isaac by Passaglia. In the architrave
(moulding) are bas-reliefs representing Florentine Saints.

MainPortal_DuomoFlorence_5612


Main Portal Duomo Florence 5612
(1076 x 1290, 744 KB)

This image was shot at a rare moment with a little direct sunlight hitting the facade.

On either side of the bronze doors in tabernacles are statues of the two co-Patron Saints of Florence:
St. Reparata on the left and St. Zenobius on the right. The two statues were created by Amalia Dupre,
the eldest daughter and the primary pupil of Giovanni Dupre, who were both famed Italian sculptors.
Giovanni Dupre was scheduled to create the Madonna for the upper niche below the Rose Window,
the crowning image for the facade, but he died and Tito Sarocchi received the commission instead.
(detailed views of the sculptures are on the Architectural Scenics, Sculptures and Interiors page).

On the lintel above the doors and on the same level on the architrave and the front of the pilasters
are medallions containing coats of arms of various prominent families that contributed to the facade.

MainPortal_detail_4272M


Main Portal detail 4272M
693 x 1775 (533 KB)

MainPortal_StReparata_4272


Main Portal St. Reparata 4272
779 x 1290 (499 KB)

Detail of St. Reparata beside the bronze doors of
the Porta Maggiore, by Amalia Dupre. To the left is
an M-sized detail crop (693 x 1775, 533 KB) of the left
side of the bronze door. Built between 1899 and 1903,
the doors display scenes from the life of the Madonna.
More on the Scenics, Sculptures and Interiors page.

19thC_MainPortalLunette_DuomoFlorence_4264


19th c. Main Portal Lunette Duomo Florence 4264
(1500 x 1200, 762 KB)

In the architrave (moulding around the lunette) are finely detailed sculptures of Florentine Saints,
Angels (some with musical instruments) and several animals (Ram, Horse, Lions, Wolf and Dove).

Closer detail of the central lunette mosaic is displayed in the image shown below.

19thC_MainPortalLunette_Detail_4249


19th c. Main Portal Lunette Detail 4249
(1456 x 1275, 765 KB)

Central Lunette Mosaic (by Niccolo Barabino): “Christ Enthroned with Mary and St. John the Baptist”.
Also depicted are St. Ann, St. Lawrence, St. Mary Magdalene de Pazzi, St. Juliana Falconieri,
and the Blessed Humiliana de Cerchi (all of these subjects are Protectors of Florence).

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_5080


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 5080

In the tabernacle niches flanking the right Portal
are statues of Pope Eugenius IV (left, who supported
Florence against Milan in the Lombard Wars), and
 St. Antoninus (Antonio Pierozzi, the Archbishop of
 Florence, a great supporter of the poor and needy).

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4024


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4024

Detail of the right Portal, Rosette Window, and the
statue of St. Antoninus on the right. The tondo sculpture
is the Madonna Dolorosa (Madonna of Sorrows), in the
center of three angels in the triangular spaces of the
tympanum, bearing flowers. The Madonna relief was
created by Gallori, and the reliefs of angels bearing
flowers were created by Zocchi. Details shown below.

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4242M


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4242M
(1246 x 1586, 754 KB)

This large M-sized image shows details of the doorway reliefs, the lunette,
the tympanum, the pillars flanking the  doorway, and the two statues beside it.

The statues are of Pope Eugenius IV (1383-1447), who supported Florence against Milan and
was also responsible for breaking the power of the Concilar movement. He also consecrated the
Cathedral in 1436; and of St. Antoninus (Antonio Pierozzi, Archbishop of Florence, 1389-1459), a
gentle man of great humility who provided for the sick and needy, especially during the plague years
of 1448 and 1449, the earthquake which followed in 1453, the cyclone in 1456, and the famine which
followed. These were difficult years, and “Little Anthony” supported the people in every way possible.

The small statues in the tabernacles on the pillars beside the doorway house a statue of Abraham on the
left, poised with his knife to sacrifice the Ram, and Sarah and Isaac on the right, both by Adriano Cecioni.

BronzeDoors_RightPortal_Duomo_4251


Bronze Doors Right Portal Duomo 4251

BronzeDoors_RightPortal_Detail_4251c


Bronze Doors Right Portal Duomo 4251c

To the left, an image of the entire doorway to the
right Portal, with marble mouldings. Above is a
1062 x 1299 detail image of the center panels of
both doors. These doors (along with the two of
 the left and central portals) were built between
1899-1903 and depict scenes from the life of Mary.

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4266


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4266
786 x 1290 (561 KB)

Detail of the right Portal lunette, mosaic, tympanum and tondo.
Further detail shots with progressively closer views are below.

Upper_RightPortal_4010


Upper Right Portal 4010
800 x 1290 (488 KB)

Another of the set of detail images taken on that dark
and dreary first afternoon (thus the color), depicting
the Rosette Window and three of the Apostles.

The tympanum houses a tondo sculpture of the Madonna Dolorosa (Madonna of Sorrows),
in the center of three angels in the triangular spaces of the tympanum, bearing flowers. The Madonna
relief was created by Gallori, and the reliefs of angels bearing flowers were created by Zocchi.

The lunette mosaic, by Niccolo Barabino depicts Mary surrounded by
“Florentine Artists, Merchants and Humanists”. A detail shot of the mosaic
is below, along with detail shots of the tympanum and the Rosette Window.

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4267c


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4267c
1270 x 1270 (865 KB)

RosetteDetail_DuomoFlorence_4045


Rosette Detail Duomo Florence 4045

Above is a 1500 x 1110 (600 KB) detail shot of the
Rosette Window above the right portal. To the left is a
highly detailed 1270 x 1270 (865 KB) image showing
the tondo over the right portal, with the Madonna
Dolorosa supported by Angels bearing Flowers.

19thC_RightPortalDetail_DuomoFlorence_4266c


19th c. Right Portal Detail Duomo Florence 4266c
(1409 x 1175, 723 KB)

A close detail shot of the right portal mosaic by Niccolo Barabino, which
depicts Mary surrounded by “Florentine Artists, Merchants and Humanists”.
Bas-reliefs are, from bottom left: The Angel of the Apocalypse (with scythe);
St. Michael (with the helmet and sword); the Angel that liberated St. Peter;
at the apex of the arch is St. Elizabeth with her hands extended in welcome;
an Angel of the Resurrection with a Palm in the right hand and a Skull in the left;
Archangel Raphael with a fish; an Angel of the Apocalypse with a Chalice Overturned.

BrunelleschiDome_4803M


Brunelleschi Dome 4803M
1418 x 1550 (700 KB)

An M-sized view of Brunelleschi’s spectacular dome
taken from the top of Giotto’s Campanile (Bell Tower).
The tiny people on the top of the Dome will provide scale.

Brunelleschi’s dome was inspired by the Dome of the Pantheon in Rome. The dome is built from
stone and brick because the formula for concrete was lost in antiquity. He built it as a double-dome,
with the interior resting on the drum using no additional support (no buttress or scaffolding were used).

More information and views of Brunelleschi’s ground-breaking Dome can be seen on the page
which details Santa Maria del Fiore Architectural Scenics, Sculptures and Interior Details.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Florence Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

Direct Link to the Gallery with images of Santa Maria del Fiore

Florentine Churches: The Duomo

There are a number of images in this section that are not yet on the Photoshelter site.
If an image you want is not yet uploaded, contact Ron Reznick (info at bottom of page).

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 11 Galleries in the Photoshelter Florence Collection

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Select another page from the section on the Basilica of Santa Maria del Fiore

Duomo_ScenicsSculps_Interiors


Click the banner above for Architectural Scenics, Sculptures, and Interior Details

GiottoCampanile


Click the banner above for Giotto’s Campanile

Baptistry


Click this banner for the Baptistry and Gates of Paradise

Return to the Master Index on the Florence Select page

Florence_Select


Click the display composite above to return to the Master Index on the Florence Select page

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