Fremont_Anasazi_Petroglyphs

A compilation of Fremont Culture Petroglyphs and Pictographs from Capitol Reef and
Calf Creek Canyon and Anasazi Petroglyphs from Chaco Canyon and Monument Valley.

The Fremont Culture petroglyphs in Capitol Reef National Park depict anthropomorphic
and zoomorphic (animal) figures, spirit figures and symbols. The Calf Creek Canyon
Pictographs depict a Shaman and Warrior Figures. These were created by the
Fremont Culture people, a group of hunters and farmers who lived on the
Western Colorado Plateau from about 500 BC to about 1500 AD.

The Anasazi Petroglyphs from Chaco Canyon and Monument Valley also
depict anthropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, spirit figures and symbols.
The Anasazi petroglyphs exhibit a different style than the Fremont petroglyphs,
and the Chaco Canyon and Monument Valley petroglyphs are also quite different
from each other. Some tell stories, such as that of the Shaman or Chief who was
struck by Lightning, others may be interpreted as hunting magic, and some
are difficult to interpret, such as the Pronghorn Antelope and Two Spirals
(which looks like an Antelope riding a bicycle). Some of the Chaco
petroglyphs are quite recognizable, such as the Mountain Lion,
the Fish and the Rattlesnake, yet others remain a mystery.

Click an image to open a larger version.
Use your back button to return to this page.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection where a Gallery can be selected.

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There are 14 Sections in the Photoshelter Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection

Direct Links:

Anasazi and Fremont Petroglyphs

Chaco Culture: Petroglyphs
Monument Valley: Hogans and Petroglyphs

Indian Lands Select
(150 Selected images)

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Fremont Culture Petroglyphs
Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

The Fremont people were a diverse set of groups who were contemporaries of the
Anasazi but lived a different sort of lifestyle. Most were small bands of hunters, foragers
and corn farmers who lived in small pit house villages, moving every few years, however, in
a few places they created large stable villages. Their artifacts were varied and there were
few similarities between groups other than their use of moccasins rather than the sandals
of the Anasazi and the fact that they retained the hunter/gatherer culture, farming part-time.
They did have a typical pottery style and their petroglyph designs were quite distinctive.
The Fremont culture began about 2500 years ago and flourished until the culture
gradually disappeared between 1250-1500 AD, as did the Anasazi culture.

Fremont_Anthropomorphs_Capitol_Reef_7294


Fremont Anthropomorphs Capitol Reef 7294
(643 KB)

The Anthropomorph panel at the Fruita Petroglyph Cliff depicts several trapezoidal-bodied
anthropomorphic figures in headdresses. Some have square featureless heads, some have
trapezoidal featureless heads, one has a square head with eyes and a nose, and several have
no head at all... just a neck with the headdress growing out of it. Bighorn Sheep are cavorting
around and above each of the figures, and there are a number of symbols on the panel.
Trapezoidal bodies are typical of the Classic Vernal style of Fremont petroglyph.
The earbobs on some of the figures were derived from Anasazi petroglyphs.

Many panels on this Wingate Sandstone cliff exhibit significant gunfire damage.

These images were taken two years apart, at different times of day, in different light
and with different cameras and lenses. This is a selection of three of the six images
of this panel which are available. The light, composition and image character differ.

Fremont_Anthropomorphs_Capitol_Reef_1477


Fremont Anthropomorphs Capitol Reef 1477
(886 KB)

A number of petroglyph panels like this have been interpreted as shamanistic hunting magic. This is still controversial...

Fremont_Anthropomorphs_Capitol_Reef_5856


Fremont Anthropomorphs Capitol Reef 5856
(979 KB)

Some of the other experts interpret these glyphs as a travel metaphor or as a ceremony or event. No one really knows...

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Sheep_Capitol_Reef_1479


Fremont Anthropomorph Sheep Capitol Reef 1479
(885 KB)

‘Ice Cream Cone’ anthropomorph with a trapezoidal body and head and a style of headdress different than typical Fremont curved horns (this headdress has two curved arcs, as does that of the petroglyph to its right shown further below), with a Bighorn Sheep figure above its head. The two open arcs in sign language or petroglyphs usually translate as empty space or a similar concept depending on context, so this symbol may be saying that the anthropomorph is an ‘airhead’.   :^)

Fremont_Kokopelli_Capitol_Reef_1484c


Fremont Kokopelli Capitol Reef 1484c
(788 KB)

Kokopelli is a spirit figure dating back over 3000 years. Often represented as a humpbacked anthropomorphic insect with a flute (and sometimes a huge phallus), Kokopelli is a fertility deity (childbirth, agriculture and game reproduction), a healer, a prankster and is also the spirit of music. The name derives from the Hopi name for the deity (Koko: wood, Pilau: hump). There are numerous myths associated with Kokopelli, and his image has become a universal symbol of the Southwest. The hump is said to represent the bag of seeds and the songs he carries from place to place in his travels.

Fremont_Petroglyphs_Capitol_Reef_7306


Fremont Petroglyphs Capitol Reef 7306
(712 KB)

This image shows the context of the Kokopelli petroglyph to the panel in which it resides.
Kokopelli is in the upper left of the panel, presiding over a series of different anthropomorphs
in headdresses, symbols, and a rabbit (below left). Note the cruder anthropomorph (lower right).
Several detail images of each of the anthropomorphic figures in this panel are shown below.

Some interpretations of the flute-player petroglyph do not identify it with Kokopelli.
Information on petroglyph interpretation is spotty and is sometimes contradictory.

Fremont_Petroglyphs_Capitol_Reef_5865


Fremont Petroglyphs Capitol Reef 5865
(870 KB)

The horns on these anthropomorphs are thought to represent Shamanistic or supernatural powers, and may have derived from the earlier Barrier Canyon style petroglyphs.

Fremont_Petroglyphs_Capitol_Reef_5875


Fremont Petroglyphs Capitol Reef 5875
(859 KB)

Detail of the two anthropomorphs on the left of the panel. The horns are similar to antlers, and the doubled horns on the left  in many cases represents a figure with special power.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_7310


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 7310
(671 KB)

Close detail of the central anthropomorph. Note the brow, nose and eye,
the circular head and the rounded body style of this petroglyph. This body
shape is similar to that of the Barrier Canyon rock art of the Archaic period.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_1485


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 1485
(537 KB)

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_5867


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 5867
(647 KB)

The images above show a symbol often interpreted as an Anthropomorph in Headdress, shot in different
light (with different cameras) and a two year gap between images. Note that the flake below the symbol has
broken off in the intervening two years. Besides damage and loss which is sometimes caused by people,
the freezing and thawing of ice every year expands cracks and causes eventual loss of the petroglyphs.

This far cruder image (detail of the lower right anthropomorph from the panel shown above) seems to
have been created later than the rest of the panel based upon sharper incision and lack of desert varnish.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_7299


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 7299
(763 KB)

This anthropomorph has hairbobs (or earrings) derived from Anasazi petroglyphs, and a rounded upper head shape. There are snake symbols across the chest of the petroglyph.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_7299_inversion


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 7299 inversion
(564 KB)

The same image, with a channel-balanced conversion to grayscale, and a level adjusted inversion to improve contrast. This technique allows examination of faint, low-contrast detail.

Petroglyphs can be exceptionally challenging to photograph, and some are very difficult
to process and achieve good legibility and contrast. In some cases, more detail can be
discerned by performing a channel-balanced grayscale conversion and a level-adjusted
inversion in post-processing. Some of the other faint, low-contrast images processed
in this way are displayed on this page. Several others are displayed on Petroglyph
pages specific to a particular venue (Monument Valley and Chaco Culture).

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Fremont_Petroglyphs_Capitol_Reef_5874


Fremont Petroglyphs Capitol Reef 5874
(634 KB)

A series of medicine symbols and a Bighorn Sheep along with a symbol often interpreted as a Cactus or Cholla plant. A series like this generally is interpreted as a travel or hunt story.

Fremont_Petroglyph_Capitol_Reef_1492


Fremont Petroglyph Capitol Reef 1492
(641 KB)

Detail of the Cactus (or Cholla) petroglyph taken two years earlier.  The cactus interpretation is sometimes disputed, as are a great many interpretations of petroglyphs.

Fremont_Petroglyphs_Capitol_Reef_7308


Fremont Petroglyphs Capitol Reef 7308
(806 KB)

Detail of the Bighorn Sheep and Cactus (Cholla) petroglyphs, taken at yet another time.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_5862


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 5862
(405 KB)

This image of the “ice cream cone” shaped anthropomorph was taken two years after the one shown near the top of the page, framed with foliage and rocks to form a vignette.

Fremont_Zoomorphs_Capitol_Reef_5860


Fremont Zoomorphs Capitol Reef 5860
(612 KB)

Detail of a Zoomorph panel illustrating a Bear, a Dog and a Bighorn Sheep along with several other faint symbols that are difficult to discern.

Fremont_Bighorn_Sheep_Capitol_Reef_5855


Fremont Bighorn Sheep Capitol Reef 5855
(867 KB)

Two large Bighorn Sheep petroglyphs share this panel with several symbols. There are
several abstract designs on the right. On the far right are two symbols which are similar to
Archaic petroglyphs. Just left of these there appears to be a rabbit popping out of a hat
(I have been unable to determine what this stylized petroglyph may be). Another stylized
symbol is directly behind the central Bighorn Sheep. Considerable searching has not yet
turned up anything to help identify the ‘rabbit in the hat’ or the symbol behind the sheep.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Sheep_Capitol_Reef_5884


Fremont Anthropomorph Sheep Capitol Reef 5884
(653 KB)

Another image of the ‘ice cream cone’ anthropomorph and the Bighorn Sheep, taken at an angle showing incision depth.

Fremont_Anthropomorph_Capitol_Reef_1496


Fremont Anthropomorph Capitol Reef 1496
(901 KB)

The anthropomorph to the right of the ‘ice cream cone’, with a more traditional body shape and hair bobs, and an arced headdress similar to that of the ‘ice cream cone’.

Fremont_Anthropomorphs_Sheep_Capitol_Reef_1481


Fremont Anthropomorphs Sheep Capitol Reef 1481
(1120 KB)

This highly detailed image shows the entire section of the panel with the
two anthropomorphs and the Bighorn Sheep, connected by a field of dots.

Fremont_Pictographs_Calf_Creek_Canyon_0877


Fremont Pictographs Calf Creek Canyon 0877
(745 KB)

Two of the seven available images of the Calf Creek Canyon Pictographs are displayed here (to the right is a detail crop of roughly 50% of this image to show greater detail).

Fremont_Pictographs_Calf_Creek_Canyon_0877c


Fremont Pictographs Calf Creek Canyon 0877c
(698 KB)

This pictograph dates from the period prior to 1000 AD, and depicts two warrior figures flanking a shaman figure, with a smaller shaman figure in a lined robe at the lower right.

Fremont_Pictographs_Calf_Creek_Canyon_0954


Fremont Pictographs Calf Creek Canyon 0954
(664 KB)

A Pictograph is painted on a rock surface rather than incised or pecked into the surface.

The interpretation given above is the most common interpretation of these pictographs.
Others include that they are deities or cultural heroes, or a depiction of a ceremony or event.

This pictograph is near the bottom of the eastern Navajo Sandstone wall of
Calf Creek Canyon in the Grand Staircase Escalante near Boulder, Utah.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection where a Gallery can be selected.

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There are 14 Sections in the Photoshelter Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection

Direct Links:

Anasazi and Fremont Petroglyphs

Chaco Culture: Petroglyphs
Monument Valley: Hogans and Petroglyphs

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(150 Selected images)

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The Anasazi (or Hisatsinom) were Ancestral Pueblo people who lived in the
Four Corners area of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona until the 300-year
Great Drought forced them to migrate in the 13th century. They have been known as
Anasazi for many years (Navajo word meaning “ancient ones” or “enemy ancestors”,
and are also referred to by the Hopi term Hisatsinom, which means “ancient people”.

Below are a group of Anasazi petroglyphs from the Eye of the Sun Arch area of
Monument Valley. Further below is another group from Chaco Canyon in Northern
New Mexico, the primary cultural center of the Anasazi Ancestral Pueblo people.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1521


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1521
(684 KB)

In a niche below the Eye of the Sun Arch in Monument Valley are a group of Bighorn Sheep.
Light was low in the niche. This shot required a 1/4 sec. at f/8 exposure. The dark desert varnish
gives excellent contrast though, making these sheep petroglyphs far more legible than many others.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1531


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1531
(630 KB)

Unlike most Bighorn petroglyphs which are depicted static or with limited motion, the top right petroglyph shows the Bighorn leaping, its motion accentuated by the static sheep below.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1525


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1525
(749 KB)

Detail of the leaping Bighorn Sheep at Eye of the Sun Arch. Note the deeply rounded bellies of these Anasazi petroglyphs in comparison to the flatter bellies of the Fremont sheep.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1527


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1527
(513 KB)

Detail of the Bighorn Sheep in the center of the Eye of the Sun group.
These show the more typical static position and walking movements.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_Wall_X1551


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyph Wall X1551
(723 KB)

On the cliff wall opposite Eye of the Sun Arch are numerous Anasazi petroglyphs.
This image is an overview of the major section of the wall, showing several figures
of Anthropomorphs (Shamans and others), Zoomorphs (Pronghorn Antelope, Bighorn
Sheep, Snakes, and others), numerous symbols and the story of a Shaman or Chief
who was struck by Lightning. Detail images and an Inversion are shown below.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_Wall_X1551_inv


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyph Wall X1551 inversion
(555 KB)

A channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion of the
Petroglyph Wall opposite Eye of the Sun Arch in Monument Valley. This technique
brings out detail in low-contrast areas and allows better examination of detail.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1556


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1556
(864 KB)

The section of the Petroglyph Wall depicting a Shaman or Chief being struck by Lightning.
On the left is a Pronghorn Antelope standing on a field of dots. Above the field of dots and
below the Shaman or Chief is a long, sinuous snake petroglyph, with the head below the
anthropomorph’s foot on our left. Above the Shaman or Chief are the lightning bolts and
the doubled wavy line representing the thunderclouds. To our right of the anthropomorph
is another smaller snake just above and to the right of an undecipherable petroglyph.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1556_inv


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1556 inversion
(737 KB)

A channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion of the image above.
Note the square body of the Pronghorn on the left, reminiscent of the body shapes of Fremont
zoomorphs shown in the previous section. Compare this to the shape of the Bighorn below.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_X1536


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1536
(879 KB)

The rounded belly of this Bighorn Sheep is similar to those in the group at Eye of the Sun Arch, displayed before this section. Your imagination may supply an identification of the pecked dots below the rump of this Bighorn Sheep.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_X1560


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1560
(1002 KB)

On the right side of the wall is this unusual representation of a Pronghorn standing between two spirals. It appears as if the Pronghorn is riding a bicycle, which may not be far off, as the generally accepted meaning of the spiral is “great journey”.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1563


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1563
(630 KB)

Detail of the Shaman or Chief being struck by Lightning. Note the necklace or chest-plate decoration, the enormous hands, feet and scrotum, and the tiny head.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_X1557_4x5


Monument Valley
Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1557 4x5
(776 KB)

This Anasazi Anthropomorph is most often interpreted as a Shaman. Note the triangular body and the horned headdress, reminiscent of the Fremont style of petroglyphs shown earlier.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_X1561


Monument Valley
Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1561
(735 KB)

This faint figure has been interpreted both as a Turtle and as a Shield Figure. The image was extremely difficult to process. The inversion to the right allows easier examination of detail.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyph_X1561_inv


Monument Valley
Eye of the Sun Petroglyph X1561 inversion
(515 KB)

Note the fields of dots running above, through and below the figure. The pattern on the shield itself is quite similar to the plates on a turtle shell, but the feet are anthropomorphic.

Monument_Valley_Eye_of_the_Sun_Petroglyphs_X1554


Monument Valley Eye of the Sun Petroglyphs X1554
(964 KB)

Another of the stylized, triangular anthropomorphic figures, this one with nine dots
in the headdress. Its location in a streak of dark desert varnish makes it easy to see.
The shape of this Shaman is similar to the other triangular anthropomorph shown earlier.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection where a Gallery can be selected.

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There are 14 Sections in the Photoshelter Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection

Direct Links:

Anasazi and Fremont Petroglyphs

Chaco Culture: Petroglyphs
Monument Valley: Hogans and Petroglyphs

Indian Lands Select
(150 Selected images)

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Chaco Canyon housed what became the major cultural center of the Anasazi people.
Between 850 and 1250 AD, they built a number of enormous Great Houses using several
sophisticated masonry techniques and an even greater number of Small Houses. They also built
an extensive system of roads. Chaco Culture contained the largest buildings in North America
until the 19th century. Between two of the larger complexes, on the north wall of the canyon
are a series of petroglyphs. There are also some spectacular petroglyphs partway up
the cliff behind one of the oldest of the Great Houses, Una Vida in the Fajada Gap.

Some of the petroglyphs are Anasazi, some are Navajo, and a few are graffiti.

Because of the light color of the sandstone and desert varnish in many parts of
Chaco Canyon, the petroglyphs are difficult to photograph and extremely difficult
to process effectively. Channel balanced grayscale inversions of the large-panel
areas have been provided, which allow examination of the low contrast detail.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_X9619M


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs X9619 M
1692 x 1000 (666 KB)

This section of the North Canyon Wall contains a number of spirals, both separate and interconnected,
several snake glyphs and lizards, and various symbols. Spirals are a common symbol at Chaco Canyon.

Chaco_NorthWall_Petroglyphs_Inversion_X9619


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs Inversion X9619
(465 KB)

A channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion of the image above.
At the far right is a snake glyph slithering up the wall towards a triangle glyph. Just left of these
and below (above the horizontal crack) is another snake glyph. Look above this and left and you
will see a set of spirals, above the largest of which is yet another snake glyph. Below this spiral
is a lizard glyph and a large symbol which may depict a cactus. Left of the central crack are
another lizard glyph, more spirals, fields of dots and several other weathered symbols.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_5177


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5177
(690 KB)

The central feature of this section of the wall is a set of connected ovals which may be a
Centipede glyph. To the right of this is a definite Centipede in a field of dots. Below the large
central “Centipede” are two tripartite glyphs which resemble bird tracks (there is a larger glyph
of this type at the far right of the image). Right of the smaller Centipede are snake glyphs and
two lizard glyphs within the field of dots, then a larger bird track and another large tripartite
glyph. Below these glyphs and the long horizontal crack, on the entire right wall is a long
horizontal serpentine glyph which is bisected by a vertical one, which in this case
may represent a creek system. Left of the central “Centipede” are a number
of symbols, including more bird tracks and several zoomorphs. Note on
the upper left what looks to be a Road Runner with tripartite feet that
greatly resemble the tripartite glyphs. There are other zoomorphs
including a Scorpion at the far upper left of the image and an
unidentifiable zoomorph below and between these two.

Chaco_NorthWall_Petroglyphs_Inversion_5176


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs Inversion 5176
(518 KB)

A channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion of the image above.
Many of the fainter petroglyphs will be far more easily examined in this inverted grayscale image.

Chaco_NorthWall_Petroglyphs_5176c


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5176c
(613 KB)

Details of the two central ”Centipedes” and bird tracks, the field of dots, the lizard and snake petroglyphs, and below the horizontal crack: the bisected alluvial (?) serpentine glyph.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyph_X9616


Chaco North Wall Petroglyph X9616c
(584 KB)

Identified as a “possible supernatural figure” by the National Park Service, this petroglyph was shot even though its hands were up in obvious surrender.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_5169


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5169
(574 KB)

This section of the North Canyon Wall contains a Rattlesnake petroglyph, a “bird track”,
a wandering trail at the right which may be a map of some kind, and a series of central
“graffiti” figures which were inscribed in more modern times (see detail shots below).

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_X9625


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs X9625
(788 KB)

These figures were pecked in modern times, possibly by the Navajo or shepherds in the canyon after Anasazi times.

Chaco_Rattlesnake_Petroglyph_X9626


Chaco Rattlesnake Petroglyph X9626
(749 KB)

A detail shot of the coiled Rattlesnake petroglyph in the lower left section of the wall (also possibly a more modern glyph).

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Chaco_Fish_Petroglyph_X9630


Chaco Fish Petroglyph X9630
(853 KB)

This Fish is a combination petroglyph and pictograph.

Chaco_Navajo_Petroglyph_5166


Chaco Navajo Petroglyph 5166
(775 KB)

A fairly recent Navajo Horse and Rider petroglyph.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_5175


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5175
(823 KB)

A deeply incised but indescipherable stylistic petroglyph.

Chaco_North_Wall_Pictograph_5164


Chaco North Wall Pictograph 5164
(594 KB)

A zoomorphic pictograph (painted rock art).

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_5167


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5167
(517 KB)

Road Runner and Mountain Lion petroglyphs on the North Wall of Chaco Canyon.

Chaco_Mountain_Lion_Petroglyph_X9623


Chaco Mountain Lion Petroglyph X9623
(767 KB)

Both Road Runners and Mountain Lions were revered as protectors
for war and hunting, and as the guardians of medicine societies. The
animals and their tracks are often represented together in petroglyphs.

Chaco_Road_Runner_Petroglyph_5161


Chaco Road Runner Petroglyph 5161
(808 KB)

Road Runners have been a part of the Puebloan religious expression for well over 800 years, and were as important to the Anasazi as they are to modern Puebloans. Road Runners and their tracks are common in Anasazi petroglyphs.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyphs_5171


Chaco North Wall Petroglyphs 5171
(688 KB)

These petroglyphs are of the style most commonly interpreted as Cactus and Cholla glyphs. These symbols could of course have other meanings, including clan symbols. A detail shot of the more unusual central symbol is below.

Chaco_North_Wall_Petroglyph_5173


Chaco North Wall Petroglyph 5173
(660 KB)

Detail of the central Cactus petroglyph on the North Wall of Chaco Canyon.

Una_Vida_Petroglyphs_5061


Una Vida Petroglyphs 5061
(948 KB)

High on the cliff above Una Vida Great House at Chaco Canyon is this panel of
mixed Zoomorphs, Symbols, and an Anthropomorph identified by a Hopi expert
as a symbol of the Two-Horn Society (next to the spiral). In the upper left is another
Two-Horned Anthropomorph with a raised hand, which is easier to discern in the
channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion (below).

Una_Vida_Petroglyphs_Inversion_5061


Una Vida Petroglyphs Inversion 5061
(951 KB)

When shooting this petroglyph group in the sunlight, the contrast is quite low, and getting
detail in the shot can be quite difficult. Processing this sort of image is extremely challenging,
and with even the best results it can still be difficult to discern detail. This channel-balanced
grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion allows examination of fine detail. Note
for instance, the second anthropomorph in the upper left, and the dog (or zoomorph) to
our right and below the anthropomorph. These are difficult to see in the color image.

Una_Vida_Petroglyphs_X9591


Una Vida Petroglyphs X9591
(641 KB)

Detail of the right central section of the Una Vida Petroglyph Panel taken the following winter.
This shot was taken when the petroglyphs were shaded... an easier shot with far more detail.

Una_Vida_Petroglyphs_Inversion_X9589c


Una Vida Petroglyphs Inversion X9589c
(609 KB)

A channel-balanced grayscale conversion and level-adjusted inversion
of the central right section of the Una Vida Petroglyph Panel, showing the
various Zoomorphs and Symbols, a Bird with huge feet, and the Two-Horn
Anthropomorph who can easily be seen to be holding the spiral in his left hand.
Note that a footprint was pecked into the lower right body of the Anthropomorph.

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection where a Gallery can be selected.

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There are 14 Sections in the Photoshelter Indian Lands & Anasazi Sites Collection

Direct Links:

Anasazi and Fremont Petroglyphs

Chaco Culture: Petroglyphs
Monument Valley: Hogans and Petroglyphs

Indian Lands Select
(150 Selected images)

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Indian_Lands_and_Anasazi_Sites


Click the Display Composite above to return to the Indian Lands and Anasazi Sites index page.

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