Japanese_Temples


Temples Index Page

The Temples Section contains the most extensive collection of images in the Japan Portfolio. It is separated
into ten pages covering Nara’s Horyuji (with the oldest wooden buildings in the world) and Nara’s Todaiji (the
world’s largest bronze statue in the world’s largest timber building); Osaka’s Shitennoji (Japan’s oldest temple);
three pages on the Temples of Kamakura (two pages with several temples each, the third covering Kenchoji);
three pages on the Temples of Kyoto (two pages with three temples each and the third page covering Toji);
and the Assorted Temples page which has a detailed section on Katsuoji and a number of other temples.

This page provides both hyperlinked text and graphic Indexes.
Click a Text Link or a Page Banner to select a page. —

Temples Text Link Index

Nara One:   Horyuji
Nara Two:   Todaiji

Shitennoji (Osaka)

Kamakura One:
Hasedera and Kamakura Daibutsu

Kamakura Two:  Kenchoji

Kamakura Three:
Engakuji, Hokaiji and Ofuna Kannon

Kyoto One:
Daitokuji, Ginkakuji and Kinkakuji

Kyoto Two:
Kiyomizudera, Sanjusangendo and Tenryuji

Kyoto Three:  Toji

Assorted Temples:
 

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Japan Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

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There are 21 Galleries in the Photoshelter Japan Collection
Japanese Temples are in the following Galleries (Direct Links)

Japan: Kyoto Temples 1
Daitokuji, Ginkakuji, Kinkakuji, Kiyomizudera

Japan: Kyoto Temples 2
Sanjusangendo, Tenryuji, Toji

Japan: Nara Temples
Horyuji, Todaiji

Japan: Kamakura Temples 1
Kotoku-in (Kamakura Daibutsu), Kenchoji

Japan: Kamakura Temples 2
Engakuji, Hasedera, Hokaiji, Ofuna Kannon

Japan: Shitennoji & Assorted Temples
Shitennoji, Katsuoji, Kofukuji Gojunoto,
Nanzenji Sanmon, Chion-in Sanmon,
Ryozen Kannon, Ueno Bentendo, Kanteibyo

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Page Index

Horyuji
Nara_Horyuji

Horyuji, founded in 607 by Prince Shotoku,
contains the world’s oldest wooden buildings.

Todaiji_Daibutsu
Nara_Todaiji

Todaiji (founded in 726) is home to the Nara Daibutsu, the
world’s largest bronze statue in the largest timber building.

ShitennojiKondo_Gojunoto
Shitennoji

Shitennoji, founded in 593 by Prince Shotoku,
is the oldest officially administered temple in Japan.

KamakuraDaibutsu
Kamakura_One

Hasedera, founded in 721, houses a huge wooden statue
of Kannon, but is better known for its numerous Jizo statues.

The Kamakura Daibutsu, the most famous symbol of Japan,
is an enormous bronze statue (1252) sitting in the open air.

Kenchoji
Kamakura_Two

Kamakura Two contains a detailed presentation on
Kenchoji (founded in 1253), the oldest Zen Temple in
Japan and the oldest Zen training Monastery in Japan.

It houses an ancient wooden Jizo statue, an ancient
wooden Senju-Kannon, and other National Treasures.

OfunaKannon
Kamakura_Three

Engakuji was founded in 1282 to commemorate the destruction of the invading
Mongol fleet by the Kamikaze (Divine Wind). It is a major Zen training Monastery.

Hokaiji was built in 1335 to honor the memory of the defeated Hojo clan
(and to quell their ghosts, as 900 Hojo samurai committed seppuku rather than accept defeat).

The Ofuna Kannon is an enormous concrete Kannon statue on the hill above Ofuna
just outside Kamakura. It was built as a memorial to the Atomic Bomb victims of World War II.

Kinkakuji
Kyoto_One

Daitokuji, founded in 1319, is a Zen Temple complex
with 24 sub-temples and some beautiful Sumi-e paintings.

Ginkakuji was built as the retirement villa for the 8th Shogun.
It houses the Silver Pavilion and magnificent Sand Gardens.

Kinkakuji contains the famous Golden Pavilion, built as the
retirement villa for the 3rd Ashikaga Shogun in 1397.

Sanjusangendo
Kyoto_Two

Kiyomizudera is the most beautiful temple in Kyoto.
Founded in 778, it is a large, visually stunning complex.

Sanjusangendo (founded in 1164) has Japan’s longest
wooden building, housing 1001 thousand-armed Kannons.

Tenryuji (founded in 1339) is the number one
Zen Temple in Kyoto’s Five Mountain System.

Toji_Monks
Kyoto_Three

Toji was built two years after the capital of Japan was moved to Kyoto (it was founded in 796),
and houses some very important Buddhist sculpture mandalas and the tallest pagoda in Japan.

KatsuojiTahoto_RyozenKannon
Assorted

This page has two detailed sections on Katsuoji (Osaka’s Mino Mountain) and
the Yokohama Chinatown Kanteibyo Temple, plus a number of precious tidbits
from temples encountered here and there of which I only have a few images.

Assorted Temples Index

Katsuoji
Kanteibyo
Ryozen Kannon
Chukon-do
Daiunin Gionkaku

Chion-in Sanmon
Nanzenji Sanmon
Rinnoji (Nikko)
Kofukuji Gojunoto
Ueno Bentendo

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Images in this section are in a number of different Galleries on the Photoshelter website.
The Banner below leads to the Japan Collections page where a Gallery can be selected.

PhotoshelterGallerySection


There are 21 Galleries in the Photoshelter Japan Collection
Japanese Temples are in the following Galleries (Direct Links)

Japan: Kyoto Temples 1
Daitokuji, Ginkakuji, Kinkakuji, Kiyomizudera

Japan: Kyoto Temples 2
Sanjusangendo, Tenryuji, Toji

Japan: Nara Temples
Horyuji, Todaiji

Japan: Kamakura Temples 1
Kotoku-in (Kamakura Daibutsu), Kenchoji

Japan: Kamakura Temples 2
Engakuji, Hasedera, Hokaiji, Ofuna Kannon

Japan: Shitennoji & Assorted Temples
Shitennoji, Katsuoji, Kofukuji Gojunoto,
Nanzenji Sanmon, Chion-in Sanmon,
Ryozen Kannon, Ueno Bentendo, Kanteibyo

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Return to the Master Index on the Japan Select page.

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